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Q: When do Social Security Disability (SSD) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits stop for disabled children?

A:

There is a provision for disabled children who are dependent upon a parent currently receiving Social Security (disability or retirement) benefits. If the child was disabled before age 22, he or she may be eligible for SSD benefits. Alternatively, a disabled child may be eligible to receive SSD benefits if a deceased parent worked long enough to be eligible for Social Security benefits. The Social Security Administration calls these benefits “child benefits” because they are paid on the parent’s Social Security earnings record. 

Once your child starts receiving benefits, the Social Security Administration will review the case periodically to verify that he or she is still disabled. SSD child benefits continue for as long as the disability remains. There is no work requirement for the disabled child since the parent already fulfilled those requirements. 

Supplemental Security Income

Disabled children under the age of 18 may be eligible for SSI if they meet the Social Security Administration definition of disabled and have extremely limited financial resources.  Once your child starts receiving SSI benefits, the Social Security Administration will review the case every three years to verify that the child remains disabled. When the child turns 18, the Social Security Administration will review the case using adult disability rules to determine if SSD payments will continue. 

In general, disability benefit payments for a disabled child continue as long as the disability exists. If your child is disabled and has been denied benefits by Social Security, contact an experienced Social Security Disability lawyer at Schmidt Kramer for assistance. Call us today at 888-476-0807 to schedule your free case review. We can help!